POST-APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA AND XENOPHOBIC ATTACKS ON NIGERIANS

A CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

  • Fredrick O Onyia University of Nigeria, Nsukka
Keywords: xenophobic attacks on Nigerians, Xenophobia, Frustration-Aggression theory, black majority rule

Abstract

In recent times, xenophobic attacks on Nigerians living in South Africa have been on the increase. Scholars’ attempts to situate these attacks in a proper context have also seen them taking different positions. This study seeks a conceptual prognosis of the remote and immediate causes of the frequent attacks and argues that the factors responsible for them could be located within the domestic economic imperatives in South Africa. Anchoring analysis on Frustration-Aggression theory and relying essentially on documentary method of data collection, the study argues that contrary to expectations, post-apartheid black majority rule in south Africa, have not improved the economic fortunes of blacks in any significant way. Sequestered from the commanding heights of the economy, the locals are disillusioned that black majority rule has not translated to economic prosperity for them. This is worsened by the fact that small scale businesses are also controlled by foreigners, with Nigerians as major players. This dominance and visible presence of Nigerians, the locals find nauseating. Thus frustrated, they express their anger by attacking Nigerians. The study recommends that for these attacks to stop, the South African government have to set their economy on the path of progressive growth. Secondly, it should embark on a comprehensive youth empowerment programme. Engaging the youths in viable economic activities will tame their restiveness and ultimately contain the incidence of attacks.

Author Biography

Fredrick O Onyia, University of Nigeria, Nsukka

Department of Political Science

Published
2019-05-08
How to Cite
Onyia, F. (2019). POST-APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA AND XENOPHOBIC ATTACKS ON NIGERIANS. SOUTH EAST JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, 4(1). Retrieved from https://journals.aphriapub.com/index.php/SEJPS/article/view/823